Feline Infectious Enteritis & Feline Parvovirus

Feline infectious enteritis (FIE) is a potentially fatal disease caused by infection from feline parvovirus (FPV), also known as feline panleukopenia virus. The virus is highly contagious and is spread by direct or indirect contact with faeces, urine or blood of infected cats.

While vaccination has dramatically reduced the amount of deaths associated with FPV over the past 20 years,  there has been a recent increase in diagnoses, primarily in animal shelters.

Death rates range from 50-90%, with young kittens (3-5 months) being the most vulnerable due to a waning in maternal immunity (fewer antibodies passed on by their mothers).

The incubation time is 2-14 days, meaning infected cats can appear clinically normal over this period while still being contagious.

Clinical signs of FPV/FIE are:
– Diarrhoea (sometimes bloody, and can range from mild to severe)
– Lethargy
– Fever
– Death

FPV can be cured, though infected cats may require intensive veterinary care. Even with veterinary care, dehydration and infection can be fatal for some cats.

FPV is more easily prevented than treated, and the routine annual F3 vaccination provides excellent protection.

Please contact Moorabbin Veterinary Hospital on 9555 4808 if you have any questions, or would like to check the vaccination status of your cat.

 Get in touch today to book your pets next appointment